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Carissa understood that familiarity was a powerful tool to remain connected to herself. If she loved a movie because of how it made her feel or how it made her laugh, she would watch it until the tape wore out. If she loved a book, she would read it cover to cover until the cover fell off. She was always aware of how things made her feel, and she always strived to feel how she wanted to feel.

Many people with high IQs don’t get that. They constantly look for new stimuli everywhere they turn, and because of that they rarely feel that sense of self and that sense of peace that familiarity brings.

Carissa understood that people often say one thing but mean the opposite. If you were sad, or hurting, and told her you just wanted to be alone, she would see right through it and she would remain just present enough that you would see through your gloom just long enough to start to see the light again. She knew that while you may be agitated at first, you would be thankful for her persistence later.

Many people with high IQs don’t get that. They think that we say what we’re thinking and that we say what we’re feeling. They don’t get that what we’re feeling and what we’re thinking are often two very different things.

She understood that her body brought with it no shame. If you had a problem with her body, it was your problem, not hers. It was not uncommon to have friends over and suddenly see a buck-naked Carissa run by on her way to somewhere amazing. She laughed as she did. She understood that other people felt shame in innocent nudity, and she always refused to let that change her own perception of herself.

Many people with high IQs don’t get that. To them, naked bodies hold great power, shame, and hidden communication. Love handles, fat rolls, bouncing flab, even in tiny doses it is enough to make so many people who measure so high in intelligence hide themselves completely, with more layers, and more pillows, and more fear. Their preoccupations with their breasts and their penises make them believe that no one cares about anything else when they see a naked body. Because of this, they never will experience full trust and vulnerability in those naked times when they want it most.

Carissa understood that life often means more to those who slow down. She understood this concept so thoroughly that she would dismiss with a shake of the head or a wave of the hand anyone who tried to hurry her up. Unless she was dancing or streaking, she almost always moved about at a pace that would let her absorb the world around her.

Many people with high IQs don’t get that. Time is money. Speed is power. And because of that, these people often miss their entire present world in a chase for a world they hope to one day see.

Carissa understood that love reserves no judgment. She understood that it has no conditions or boundaries. She understood that love never discriminates because of age, sex, gender, sexual orientation, financial status, or… intelligence. She understood that everyone needs love and even more importantly, she understood that she had the power to help everyone feel love, even if it took a lot of individual experimentation on her part.

Many people with high IQs don’t get that. Love becomes a commodity to many. Something given to those who pay the right price. Something received only when it makes logical sense to receive it.

We all die eventually.

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Dan Pearce is an American-born author, app developer, photographer, and artist. This blog, Single Dad Laughing, is what he’s most known for, with more than 2 million daily subscribers as of 2017. Pearce writes mostly humorous and introspective works, as well as his musings which span from fatherhood, to dating, to life, to the people and dynamics of society. Single Dad Laughing is much more than a blog. It’s an incredible community of people just being real and awesome together!